Whiteburn's Wanderings

One man's wanderings backpacking around Scotland plus the odd digression

Kovea Spider Maintenance #2

Back in 2014 I posted a piece on how to undertake simple maintenance on my favourite winter stove, HERE, which seems to have been fairly popular over the years. On a recent trip I noted once again the stoves’ output had started to drop, I managed to remove the burner head & air inlet tube in the field to give the nozzle a prick & this restored the output, not an easy task as one slip & the base assembly drops apart to this:

After reassembly the stove worked perfectly but I thought afterwards that there must be a simple modification that would allow the nozzle to be easily accessed without risking a parts explosion.

The simple solution would have been for Kovea to have added an additional component in the form of a slim nut below the air inlet tube, on the same thread, but that’s going back to the drawing board. I looked at possibly adding a couple of small screws/ bolts though the lower body but with the preheat loop, gas inlet tube, legs & springs I could find enough space.

It was only once back in the workshop when I decided to replace the filter, aka ‘bit of fluff’, in the gas nozzle that I came upon a solution. In the shop I’d routinely just put a couple of small model makers ‘G’ clamps across the base & then simply unscrew the burner head….some suitably sized simple ‘U’ shaped clips would effectively do the same job.

While searching the scrap bin for a bit of 0.5mm stainless steel sheet to bend up I fortunately came across a piece of extruded aluminium channel of just the right size & 30mins of sawing & filing produced a couple of locking ‘collets’, the copper binding wire just holds them in situ so they’re not lost & the total thing weighs a few grams.

While not being the prettiest, more agricultural engineering, they work; the burner head can be removed quickly for pricking or removing the nozzle with no fear of an ‘exploding’ stove.

2 comments on “Kovea Spider Maintenance #2

  1. Ron Mehringer
    January 14, 2022

    Now you got me thinking about how to do the same but w/o the spare aluminum channel you happened to have. Always love a challenge.

  2. Paul Atkinson
    January 17, 2022

    IMO one of the best solutions would be a very thin nut (same thread as the air inlet tube), perhaps 2mm thick, that would secure the bottom assembly with the burner/ tube removed. Lacking a lathe I couldn’t investigate the practicalities.

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This entry was posted on September 2, 2021 by in Gear and tagged .

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