Whiteburn's Wanderings

One man's wanderings backpacking around Scotland plus the odd digression

Stockli Fixed

After suffering a failure of my Stockli Dehydrator during the last run I tracked the problem down to an electronic component (thermostat, fan, timer & heater element all OK).  I contacting Stockli but they haven’t as yet sent me a replacement or identify what the component is.

Luckily John Joycys of Adventures with JJ helped me out with identifying the component, turned out it’s a 110 deg C thermal fuse & my local Maplin had a replacement in stock  http://www.maplin.co.uk/p/110c-thermal-fuse-ra64u.

The fix proved was quite simple once the internal heater/ fan chassis was removed, I replaced the original tubular rivets holding the fuse in place with 2mm bolts & attached the new fuse across these (as JJ pointed out soldering would blow the new fuse)

Fuse

Don’t know why the original fuse ‘went’ as the thermostat’s is working OK & there appears to be a thermal cut-out (bi-metallic switch)  fitted but the dehydrator now seems to be working OK; makes me wonder how many of these have been consigned to landfill with just a blown fuse.

You may download a basic instruction for the fix by clicking on the link below:

Stockli fix.doc

Time to think of producing some more meals.

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26 comments on “Stockli Fixed

  1. John J
    January 3, 2015

    Thermal fuses, like ordinary fuses, are under a bit of stress and can fail with age. I’m dead chuffed that you managed to get it sorted – I’m eagerly awaiting more of your backpacking recipes!

  2. clarechanning
    July 9, 2015

    Thank you for posting this, I have had 2 dehydrators and they have both stopped working. I did, indeed, consign the first one to landfill so I will have a go at changing the fuse on this one and let you know.

  3. clarechanning
    July 9, 2015

    Thank you to John J too 🙂

  4. lynn
    August 6, 2015

    I’ve got the same problem with my Stockli dehydrator. Can you tell me how you took it apart and replaced the piece?

    • Paul Atkinson
      August 6, 2015

      In the Pyrenees at the moment give me a couple of weeks & I’ll get back.

  5. Felix Ampofo
    September 5, 2015

    I have got the same problem with my Stockli dehydrator as you had with yours – thermostat, fan, timer and heat element all OK but not heating up. I have bought the 110 deg C thermal fuse from Maplin and would be grateful if you could please tell me how you took the dehydrator apart and replaced the thermal fuse. Many thanks.

    • Paul Atkinson
      September 5, 2015

      No problems, I’ll send an email with some info & photos.

    • Wendy
      November 12, 2015

      Hello, on scouring the web for help with my injured stockli I came across you – I would greatly appreciate for info as to how you took dehydrator apart and replaced the fuse, as am pretty sure this is what I need to do to get mine back in action. But nervous about fiddling inside.

  6. Ben Hickman
    November 12, 2015

    Thanks for this post! I have exactly the same model with exactly the same problem. I was able to identify which part was blown but couldn’t figure out what it was (thought it might have been a resistor). Stöckli has thus far also failed to respond to my repeated emails. Unfortunately your source of electronic parts doesn’t ship to Sweden, so I searched for another source. The part is not expensive, but shipping is. Considering that the heating element is connected to a thermostat that maxes out at 70 °C, I decided to just bridge the blown thermal fuse by soldering a piece of wire to the two leads. Voilà! Back in business! (P.S. I’m a backpacker too. Through- hiked the AT in ’93.)

    • Paul Atkinson
      November 13, 2015

      Hi Ben, its my belief that the thermal fuse is there to guard against overheating of the element & potential fire if the fan fails so may be not a good idea to leave the unit unattended or refit the fuse.

      • Ben Hickman
        November 13, 2015

        You are wise to post this warning (for other potential readers), but I believe that the thermostat offers sufficient protection if such a fan failure were to occur (the heating element will switch off as soon as the temperature exceeds the thermostat setting, and the maximum setting is 70 °C). So why do I think the thermal fuse is there? As a professional technical writer/translator, I suspect it may have been necessary to comply with the EU Machinery Directive.

        I also feel obliged to add that this morning (Friday) I finally received a reply to the mail I sent to [stockli at servicecenter-zimmermann dot de] on Monday. The response read as follows: “Dear Ladys and Gentlemen, Please send us a your defective unit. This will be repaired free of charge. Please put even their bill in the package. Thank you”. It looks like a machine translation (the original was probably in German), but it would seem that they have offered to repair my unit for free and will even pick up the tab (“their bill”?) for the shipping charges. I thanked them and told them this would now be unnecessary as I had repaired it myself in the meantime. I will post here again if I should experience any problems with my ‘modified’ (=bypassed fuse) dehydrator.

        Thanks again, Paul, and happy trails!

      • Paul Atkinson
        November 13, 2015

        The thermostat is on the outer shell of the unit remote from the heater element & hence needs the fan to move air across it; in the event of a fan motor failure the element will overheat quickly since there is no air movement & the thermostat will not ‘see’ it; it may be that the heater element would fail without causing an incident BUT in my opinion there is a risk.
        I had a similar reply from Stockli as yourself; I suspect the dehydrators are experiencing a problem from a particularly ‘fragile’ thermal fuse that’s failing prematurely due to the repeated power cycling.

      • Ben Hickman
        November 13, 2015

        Excellent observation, Paul. You’ve obviously given this a lot of thought. I hadn’t considered that aspect of this particular failure mode. I will have to reconsider my decision, and perhaps I will return the unit to Stöckli after all. I’ll keep you posted.

      • Paul Atkinson
        November 13, 2015

        I would have thought there was an electronics store in Sweden? Alternatively eBay or Aliexpress.

    • Jennifer
      December 25, 2016

      I’ve burned a house down with an electric blanket whose thermostat failed. Thermal fuse good. Temporarily its OK, but you should think about not leaving it on when you leave the house 🙂 I know the thread’s old, but had to comment, anyway.

  7. Barry Watson
    November 19, 2015

    Have the same problem with our Stockli, will be off to local Maplin’s (we have 2 in Leeds) to get replacement, both show 2 in stock. Plan to buy 2 so I have a spare for next time. If Ben would like one posting to Sweden, please let me know.

  8. Jaya John
    July 15, 2016

    Hi Paul and John J, many thanks to you both for posting this. I’ve just verified that the thermal fuse in my Stockli has failed by jumpering across it temporarily. Result: the happy smell of heating. Off to Maplins tomorrow!

    • Jaya John
      July 17, 2016

      Back in business! Thanks again.

  9. Lars Trier
    November 12, 2016

    Thanks a lot for the well written SOP 🙂
    My machine stopped heating in the midst of the apple chips campaign and I almost rushed out to buy a new machine before I found this post. I checked by overriding the fuse with a paper clip.
    Clearly this is the weak spot of the Stockli.
    I have located the fuse in a local electronics shop i Copenhagen at DKK 16 (USD 2). Worth spending an hour to fix an appliance that costs DKK 1000!
    Lars

    • Paul Atkinson
      November 12, 2016

      A lot of thanks should go to JJ who identified the failed component for me.

  10. ben
    March 9, 2017

    Great thank you very much for this info, I manage to repair my dryer 😀
    Love from France

  11. Raymond
    July 24, 2017

    Just after the 2 years warranty, the same problem here.
    Did some googling and found this great post.
    Thank you.

    • Paul Atkinson
      July 26, 2017

      If Stockli were customer focused I’m sure they could mod the design to make the fuse easily replaceable……but then they”d miss out on selling a new one.

      • Chris
        August 2, 2017

        same problem, hopefully same fix. Many thanks for your sharing!

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This entry was posted on January 2, 2015 by in Food and tagged .
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