Whiteburn's Wanderings

One man's wanderings backpacking around Scotland plus the odd digression

Kovea Spider Maintenance

On my recent trip to Glen Tannar I noticed that my Kovea Spider seemed to be not performing up to scratch, the output seemed to be a little lower than normal.  The stove’s been used on around 20 days backpacking over the winter and it’s probably had the equivalent of 3 Primus Power Gas 230g canisters through it using the canister inverted.

I was aware  of some issues with minor contaminants within the gas canisters blocking the stove gas nozzle (a potential issue with all stoves in inverted mode) so was prepared to do maintenance in the field.  I’d made a tiny spanner that fitted the gas nozzle and had some fine copper wire as a pricker, 2g of insurance.

Update: found a better pricker can be made from a 5cm length of bike gear change cable with a short piece of heat shrink tube over one end; stainless steel & stiffer.

IMG_0580

I’d also made sure the burner head was only finger tight to make dis-assembly easier.

In the end since the stove was still working OK I decided to strip at home and not risk losing a spring or something.

The first step is to remove the burner head and preheat tube support; the air inlet tube is then easily unscrewed with a tent skewer.

IMG_0581

The whole thing then drops to bits so I was careful not to lose the legs springs; the gas nozzle was then removed.

IMG_0579

The gas nozzle has a ‘filter’ within it, a tiny bit of ‘fluff’, which definitely seemed to have some contamination on it (dark substance).  I replaced the fluff it with a tiny piece of glass wool, made sure the nozzle was clear and then re-assembled.

Result – 100% fixed

Advertisements

6 comments on “Kovea Spider Maintenance

  1. Ron Mehringer
    January 4, 2015

    The spider is far and away my favorite canister stove but I’ve always worried that in the winter, liquid feed mode (the main reason I love this stove), the nozzle could clog due to impurities reaching it. Thanks for showing that the stove can be disassembled and cleaned.

    • Paul Atkinson
      January 4, 2015

      Hi Ron, it’s definitely worthwhile doing a trial strip down in the garage first. The needed tools are simple but getting the bits re-assembled can be a fiddly with cold fingers. Good luck.

  2. Scott Mucci
    March 16, 2015

    How can I remove the burner head? Any tools need?

    • Paul Atkinson
      March 16, 2015

      The first time I disassembled it I just stuck a peg through the air intake holes in the barrel below the burner head to stop it rotating & then undid the head by hand it wasn’t that tight, I now just keep it finger tight.

  3. boothv
    January 20, 2016

    A big thanks for this. I’m not as mechanically inclined as you, and I’m a little leery of taking my ALL TIME FAVORITE STOVE apart, but it’s good to know it can be done.

    • Paul Atkinson
      January 20, 2016

      It’s an easy job really, best to get the burner threads loosened in the shed before venturing out, it’s mush easier. Beware ‘losing’ the springs that are inside the base, I’ve managed to take out the nozzle without disturbing them by using a small clamp to how everything together, more difficult in the field where you’d need 3 hands.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Information

This entry was posted on April 6, 2014 by in Gear and tagged , .
justanothertrail

One man's wanderings backpacking around Scotland plus the odd digression

The Mountain's Silhouette

One man's wanderings backpacking around Scotland plus the odd digression

Nielsen Brown Outdoors

experiencing the outdoors wherever we are

Must Be This Way

Chat about backpacking, trekking and hiking

Daunerin' Aboot

Ian Sommerville's writing and photography

OutdoorsMH

One man's wanderings backpacking around Scotland plus the odd digression

alan sloman's big walk

One man's wanderings backpacking around Scotland plus the odd digression

secretmountain.co.uk

One man's wanderings backpacking around Scotland plus the odd digression

Land Matters

........ the blog and website of Andy Wightman

blogpackinglight

another backpacking blog

One man's wanderings backpacking around Scotland plus the odd digression

cairngormwanderer

Wandering in the Cairngorms and other lesser ranges, by Neil Reid

ness64

Hillwalking and Backpacking Trips in the Scottish Highlands

Section Hikers Backpacking Blog

Hiking and Backpacking for Beginners and Experts

%d bloggers like this: